Tag Archive | malignant

Cancer In Many Languages by Morgan (Leisha’s son)

breast cancer 30s thirties 30's stage iiic 3c mastectomy dogs kids family life

This is me with Kevin (our big dog), weenie (our little dog), and puppy (my nanna’s dog) pretending to play xbox with me  🙂

This is Morgan, my mom’s son.  Thank you for your comments and nice messages and likes on my last post.

My mom has been sick with infections for a while and is very tired & not feeling well so i thought i would write another post for her.

This time I thought I would write a post so you could see what the word cancer is in languages around the world.  In English, it is CANCER.  Cancer is “a malignant growth or tumor resulting from the division of abnormal cells.”

“Cancerous tumors are malignant, which means they can spread into, or invade, nearby tissues. In addition, as these tumors grow, some cancer cells can break off and travel to distant places in the body through the blood or the lymph system and form new tumors far from the original tumor.”

This is CANCER in other languages:

KANKER

KANCER

السرطان
ԽԵՑԳԵՏԻՆ

KHETS’ GETIN

XƏRÇƏNG
РАК

RAK

ক্যান্সার
Kyānsāra

RAKA

CÀNCER

KAINSAR

癌症

RAKOVINA

KRÆFT

KANKER

KANSER

KHANSA

 KANCERO
syöpä
καρκίνος
kansè
סרטן
KRABBAMEIN
AILSE
CANCRO
癌
GAN
암
AM
Vėžys
KREFT
سرطان
RAK
câncer
рак
cáncer
โรคมะเร็ง
Rokh marĕng
KANZER
ung thư
CANSER
umdlavuza


 ❤   🙂

There are more lanaguages and more words for cancer but i’m tired and my mom says i have to go to bed! But this should be enough to show you that cancer is such an important and major thing that there’s a word for it in every language. Every part of the world knows about cancer. It’s everywhere! Cancer doesn’t care who you are or where you live or what language you use. It’s a horrible disease!

Thank you for reading my mom’s blog and for supporting her. I know you mean a lot to her. I know she’ll be back and write again when she feels better. Shes been really tired but shes been on a lot of strong antibiotics for 6 or 7 wks now so i hope she’s better enough to write soon.

Thank you! Goodnight! from Morgan

❤     🙂       ❤      🙂      ❤     🙂

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About My Brain

brain lesion cancer breast metastasis

So I fell down the stairs again today.  I hit my head pretty hard.  And I managed to land on a section of my back that was already hurting quite a bit.

This reminded me that I never posted a “brain update” after my last oncologist entry earlier this month.  I guess I didn’t really forget to write about it, I just didn’t because I didn’t know what to say after my appointment with the neurologist the next day.

I’m still not really sure what to say.  When I arrived at the neurologist’s office, I took a seat in the waiting room with a double-sided questionnaire about my symptoms.  I pretended to fill it out, but I was just sitting there lost in thought.  I had just filled the same paper out a couple of weeks prior and my answers probably hadn’t changed, so I thought the time would be best spent staring off into the distance, clipboard on my lap and pen in my hand.

I only had a few minutes of quiet before my neurologist walked out into the big waiting room, purse on her arm.  She said ‘hi’ and said she’d be back for me as she walked out of the door.  The nurse came out moments later and took me back to the vitals station and proceeded to take my blood pressure, etc.  Before he finished, my doctor was back.  She said she’d take it from there.  She walked me back to the scale, took my purse and coat, and I stepped up to be weighed.  We then walked back to the room.  She carried my purse, her purse and my coat and chatted with me during our short walk.  She set our open purses down on her desk and I took a seat next to her.  She told me she was glad I came in because she wanted to show me my MRI so I could see “IT” for myself.

We chatted as though we were girlfriends out having a coffee date and as though we were discussing our husbands, kids, dogs, and the piles of laundry waiting for us at home.  The only difference was that the coffees were waters, the table was an exam table, and we weren’t talking about what we were making for dinner.  We were talking about the lesion in my brain.

She showed me my brain MRI.  There was the lesion.  And then the same area on my MRI from about 8 months ago.  No lesion.

Not really coffee shop conversation.

When I asked if it was a metastasis, she said that it may not be malignant.  She said that they typically see a lot of “mass effect” with malignant tumors.  (*Mass effect is damage to the brain due to the bulk of a tumor, the blockage of fluid, and/or excess accumulation of fluid within the skull.)  She said that this ‘mass effect’ was lacking on my MRI.  I asked, “Could the mass effect be lacking because it is such a new lesion?”  Maybe.  “But it could also be because it is something benign?”  Yes, definitely a possibility.  Looking at the lesion’s shape, I wondered, “Could it be because I swallowed a small grape and it went the wrong way and lodged in my brain?” But I figured that was pretty unlikely!

cancerinmythirties.wordpress.com brain cancer lesion thalamus breast cancer

The thalamus is the red area

The kicker (well, one of them!) is that it is deep in my brain — within the thalamus.  Not an easy place to access for biopsies, etc.  So no easy way to know for sure what it is.  My neurologist feels the best way to proceed is to wait a couple of months and repeat the MRI.  If it is malignant, we should expect changes.  If I have an increase of symptoms, it sounds like we can do it sooner.

Then there’s also that abnormal EEG that prompted the MRI.  So I don’t really know what to think.  On the one hand, I feel sick to my stomach because the cancer may have metastasized to my brain.  But on the other hand, I’m really hopeful that it hasn’t.  And at this point, I guess I should feel pretty grateful that it’s only a maybe and not a definite.

Cancer is the gift that keeps on giving…

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In case you were wondering what the thalamus does:

**”The thalamus has multiple functions. It may be thought of as a kind of switchboard of information. It is generally believed to act as a relay between a variety of subcortical areas and the cerebral cortex. In particular, every sensory system (with the exception of the olfactory system) includes a thalamic nucleus that receives sensory signals and sends them to the associated primary cortical area. The thalamus is believed to both process sensory information as well as relay it—each of the primary sensory relay areas receives strong “back projections” from the cerebral cortex.

The thalamus also plays an important role in regulating states of sleep and wakefulness.[9] Thalamic nuclei have strong reciprocal connections with the cerebral cortex, forming thalamo-cortico-thalamic circuits that are believed to be involved with consciousness. The thalamus plays a major role in regulating arousal, the level of awareness, and activity. Damage to the thalamus can lead to permanent coma.”

* Information from: http://www.mayfieldclinic.com/PE-BrainTumor.htm

** Information from: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thalamus