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Weekly Photo Challenge: Lunchtime — It’s My Birthday

My entry for The Daily Post’s Weekly Photo Challenge topic, Lunchtime, is a celebration of the lovely desserts I received for my birthday last week.  While my lunch fare included more than sugary goodness, I am focusing on the best part of the meal here.

I hope you enjoy my photo tribute to the birthday goodies — and flowers — I received from some of my favorite people!

If you would like to participate in a photo challenge:

http://dailypost.wordpress.com/2013/03/15/photo-challenge-lunchtime/

http://dailypost.wordpress.com/category/photo-challenges/

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Happy Waving Guy

Easter Cupcakes 2012

Coming home from an oncology appointment one day, we were driving down the busy main street of our town and I noticed a man walking by the road.  He kept a good pace and carried his head high.  He was tall and slender with a shiny bald head, but the first thing I noticed about him was his smile.  He bore a gigantic grin, one reminiscent of Alice’s Cheshire cat, and he waved to us as we drove past.  My return wave was a reflex.  I looked at my hand and could feel a smile pulling up the corners of my mouth.  Here I was waving at this strange man who was obviously a crackpot.  And I’m sure that I, waving and smiling with my shiny bald chemo head, looked like a bit of a crackpot, too.

The weeks went by, and after each appointment or long day of chemo, I looked for “Happy Waving Guy” (as I affectionately named him).  And I almost always saw him.  I began to wonder who this man was and if he spent his days walking back and forth down the road cheering up the passersby.  You see, it wasn’t just me he waved at.  It was EVERYONE.  Every car that passed along the busy road would get a smile and a wave.  And, to my surprise, it wasn’t just me who returned the wave.  It appeared that most everyone returned his wave or honked their horn or did something of that sort.

It came to be that I expected to see him after a crappy day at the Cancer Center  or the hospital.  I expected his smile and happy wave to give me a little lift.  So one day when I was terribly sick and felt like I couldn’t make it through one more treatment, we pulled into the parking lot “Happy Waving Guy” was walking by and I shouted to him.  I remember thinking, “Who’s the nutcase now?”  But I didn’t care.  I wanted to meet this man and to thank him.

He was so pleased that we stopped and that I was grateful for what he was doing.  He was out there every day, walking and waving and smiling, and trying to bring a bit of happiness to everyone who passed.  He wasn’t crazy, he wasn’t a crackpot.  He was a humanitarian.  He said that not everyone was as fond of his activity, but that the people who were made it worthwhile.

It has been 2 years now since I first met “Happy Waving Guy” a.k.a. Bill.  He continues to elicit smiles from many of the people who drive by him on his daily walks.  We keep in touch via email and he has shared a copy of his book with me and has even invited us into his home.

I believe it was one of my kids — they don’t hold anything back! — who asked him if he was always happy.  While I don’t recall his words exactly, his response went something to the tune of ‘if you act like you are happy, you may just get there’.  I know I’m paraphrasing and I may have it all wrong, but there is a lesson in there.  If you exude positive energy, some of it is bound to stick — or to come back to you, at least.

I try my best to live by this philosophy and recently read the post of another cancer patient who is trying to do the same, so I know I’m not alone in my desire to be happy despite the pitfalls of life on this slippery slope.  As I await the results of the MRI I just had, I am trying to be positive and have vowed to continue to do my best to see the joy in each day, come what may.  Of course having a positive attitude doesn’t always help or work, and some days I think the theory is a load of crap.  But most days I think it is certainly worth it to try.  At the very least, it doesn’t usually make things worse — and some days that’s good enough!

April 7, 2010 — Pink Bunny Cupcakes & Good Samaritans

This Sunday we celebrated Easter.  I’ve often heard it referred to as a time of renewal.  I think I will remember Easter this year as a time when my faith in human beings was renewed.

On Monday I called to the breast center where I had the mammogram a few years ago and told them that I was having trouble getting a referral for my breast lumps.  My call was transferred until I reached a woman who told me that I could go to a local health clinic that helps uninsured and underinsured people receive basic medical care.  For just $5 – $15, I could receive a manual breast exam.  I immediately called and scheduled the appointment.

I just returned home after a whirlwind visit to the health clinic.  First off, I have to say that it is staffed by remarkable people.  They squeezed me in at the end of the day, so I was the only patient when I arrived.  With no wait, I was brought back to be examined.  It wasn’t long before I was told that I would need a diagnostic appointment at a breast center.

Sensing my concern, the nurse told me that they would find a way to help me with the fees.  Fortunately, there are programs to help women in need receive free mammograms.  Unfortunately, these programs don’t exist—at least in our area—for women under 40.

They told me not to worry, though, and said they would do what they could to help me get taken care of.  The rest of my appointment was spent signing papers and waiting as they assembled and faxed paperwork to a program—Cancer Services (formerly the Women’s Health Partnership)—that pays for diagnostic exams for uninsured men and women with (suspected?) breast, cervical or prostate cancer.  They said that because of my age, they would need to complete extra paperwork, affidavit(s), etc. and then get them sent over right away to make a plea for help with the diagnostic appointment.

It was after 5 p.m. and they were working collectively and without complaint to coordinate everything for me.  How surprising it was not to hear “call back tomorrow” or “we’re closed” or “we can’t help you”.  I didn’t even have to ask and here they were doing their best to rally for me.  So refreshing and heartwarming, especially after the past week.

When I left, they hugged me and said they would do their best to help get me in to the breast care center where I had been seen for my past lumps.  So now I wait…  But I am waiting with a renewed faith in the medical community—or at least in the volunteer medical community.

[Because I love baking and decorating cakes and cupcakes, I thought I would leave you with some photos of the cupcakes I brought to Easter at my sister’s on Sunday…  Thanks for reading…]